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COVID-19 Infection Risk, Elective Arthroplasty and Surgical Complications, and COVID-19 Vaccination: Correspondence

Open AccessPublished:November 03, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artd.2022.10.014
      Dear Editor,
      We would like to discuss the article “COVID-19 Infection Risk Following Elective Arthroplasty and Surgical Complications in COVID-19 Vaccinated Patients: A Multicenter Comparative Cohort Study [
      • Mirghaderi S.P.
      • Salimi M.
      • Moharrami A.
      • Hosseini-Dolama R.
      • Mirghaderi S.R.
      • Ghaderi M.
      • et al.
      COVID-19 infection risk following elective arthroplasty and surgical complications in COVID-19 vaccinated patients: a multicenter comparative Cohort study.
      ].” The immunization, according to Mirghaderi et al., does not guarantee that a patient would not get COVID-19 following an arthroplasty surgery, especially in an area with a high risk of COVID-19. We believe that moderate COVID-19 measures may be necessary even in vaccinated patients [
      • Mirghaderi S.P.
      • Salimi M.
      • Moharrami A.
      • Hosseini-Dolama R.
      • Mirghaderi S.R.
      • Ghaderi M.
      • et al.
      COVID-19 infection risk following elective arthroplasty and surgical complications in COVID-19 vaccinated patients: a multicenter comparative Cohort study.
      ].
      We can all agree that providing a COVID-19 vaccine is a fantastic idea. Several factors, such as the vaccinee's past comorbidity, the kind of COVID-19, the manner of vaccine administration, and the local epidemiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, should be considered. In the absence of clinical signs, the prevalent occurrence of asymptomatic COVID-19 could also play a role [
      • Joob B.
      • Wiwanitkit V.
      Letter to the editor: coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), infectivity, and the incubation period.
      ]. Testing is frequently skipped to rule out a previous, asymptomatic COVID-19 infection. Only having a history of previous illnesses is insufficient. Laboratory testing must be performed as needed. To better identify the underlying immunological difficulties that a vaccine recipient is experiencing, certain laboratory testing should be used. Examining the underlying immunological abnormalities of vaccination recipients on a regular basis helps one to forecast the efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccine.
      This is an important consideration when determining the efficacy or safety of a vaccination.
      Despite the fact that data on prevaccination health or immunological status are occasionally lacking, various clinical articles have demonstrated the efficacy, safety, or clinical significance of the COVID-19 vaccine. Furthermore, the possibility of cross-contamination with an undetected severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection cannot be completely eliminated. Another recent study [
      • Čiučiulkaitė I.
      • Möhlendick B.
      • Thümmler L.
      • Fisenkci N.
      • Elsner C.
      • Dittmer U.
      • et al.
      GNB3 c.825c>T polymorphism influences T-cell but not antibody response following vaccination with the mRNA-1273 vaccine.
      ] discovered a relationship between inherited genetic variation and vaccine recipients' immunological reaction. If additional research is planned, the impact of the genetic polymorphism should be assessed.

      Conflicts of interest

      The authors declare there are no conflicts of interest.
      For full disclosure statements refer to https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artd.2022.10.014.

      Appendix A. Supplementary Data

      References

        • Mirghaderi S.P.
        • Salimi M.
        • Moharrami A.
        • Hosseini-Dolama R.
        • Mirghaderi S.R.
        • Ghaderi M.
        • et al.
        COVID-19 infection risk following elective arthroplasty and surgical complications in COVID-19 vaccinated patients: a multicenter comparative Cohort study.
        Arthroplast Today. 2022; 18: 76-83https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artd.2022.09.005
        • Joob B.
        • Wiwanitkit V.
        Letter to the editor: coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), infectivity, and the incubation period.
        J Prev Med Public Health. 2020; 53: 70
        • Čiučiulkaitė I.
        • Möhlendick B.
        • Thümmler L.
        • Fisenkci N.
        • Elsner C.
        • Dittmer U.
        • et al.
        GNB3 c.825c>T polymorphism influences T-cell but not antibody response following vaccination with the mRNA-1273 vaccine.
        Front Genet. 2022; 13: 932043

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